Tag Archives | unpalatable

'The Weight of History'

Breaking Through to the Other: Part II

A conversation between Sophia Remolde and AE on identity, community, art, empathy and learning to exist between and beyond binaries. Part two is centered around process and transcendence. Read part one here.     AE: I would love to hear more about your path as an artist. What are some of the struggles you’ve faced […]

Continue Reading · Comments { 1 }
Hair Stroke by Paradise Khanmalek

Hair Stroke & Flowers: Visual Art by Paradise Khanmalek

Visual art by Paradise Khanmalek     Paradise is an artist, illustrator, and writer based out of LA. She makes art inspired by her own beautiful fat brown body, plants, magic, and science fiction. You can see more of her work at her website.

Continue Reading · Comments { 1 }

Ugly is An Empty Room: Prose by Sanaa

A prose piece by Sanaa. My mother and I are having an argument about the hair on my arms. It grows thick, long and casts a permanent halo over my skin. It grows against her wishes. “I don’t understand why you don’t get rid of it. It doesn’t look good,” she tells me. Since I […]

Continue Reading · Comments { 1 }

I Don’t Want to Be Closed Off: Visual Art by Raychelle Duazo

A visual art piece by Raychelle Duazo From the artist: “I Don’t Want to Be Closed Off” is a simple self-portrait in the style of a comic book panel. As a comics artist whose body of work is autobiographical and often very personal, I feel hyper visible as an API person and wanted to relay […]

Continue Reading · Comments { 1 }
Reclaiming Durian

Reclaiming Durian: Visual Storytelling by Cynthia Fong

A visual storytelling piece by Cynthia Fong.   TRANSCRIPT Chinese word for ‘durian’ durian | noun | du*ri*an | [phonetic notation for ‘durian’] a fruit with a thick coat of sharp and unforgiving thorns. upon break-ing the shell, you find a soft, love-shaped center. you exca-vate the gold with your hands like your mother did, […]

Continue Reading · Comments { 1 }
Jungli Cover Image

Jungli: A Poem by Salwa Tareen

A poem by Salwa Tareen. Salwa Tareen is a recent college graduate, community organizer, and writer from Kalamazoo, Michigan. As a Pakistani-American woman born in Saudi Arabia and raised in Canada, in her spare time she enjoys thinking of clever quips to the question: “No, where are you really from?”

Continue Reading · Comments { 1 }
Humpadori Image created by Bishakh Som

Selections from The Trouble with Humpadori

A visual art piece by Bishakh Som and poems by Vidhu Aggarwal   THE-WORLD-IS-FLAT FRIEND Before ever having been stomped on, I had the character of a martyr and a slave. In my character— a terrible passivity. Tag it: a new species of calm. Pressed into service, there’s nothing to do but expand. I’m expansive, low […]

Continue Reading · Comments { 1 }

She Smells: A Poem by Esha Pillay

A poem read and written by Esha Pillay.     Esha is a fifth generation Indo-Fijian who is searching for her roots in relation to the diaspora. She currently works in higher education in Boston, Massachusetts and is a contributor for gal-dem magazine. She also believes in fighting microaggressions, even more so than breathing.

Continue Reading · Comments { 1 }
From 'Leaving These Shores'

Breaking Through to the Other: Part I

A conversation between Sophia Remolde and AE on identity, community, art, empathy and learning to exist between and beyond binaries. Part one is centered around perceptions and challenges of art-making. Part two continues here.   Humans have a deep evolutionary habit of labeling things so that they can feel safe and survive. What happens when […]

Continue Reading · Comments { 0 }
Eye of Shaman

Self-Portrait of a Shaman: Mixed Media by Sophia Terazawa

An “illustration and invocation” by Sophia Terazawa.   My grandfather was a Japanese prisoner of war when the first atomic bomb dropped over Hiroshima. He slept next to an open window that August night in Siberia. The following morning, he woke to a cell full of dead inmates. They had all suffocated on carbon monoxide. […]

Continue Reading · Comments { 1 }